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Posts Tagged ‘olive oil’

Things have been a little quiet at “The Pear Tree” recently. But we have been making lists of things we want to cook and things we have been practicing and  will be posting shortly. Another thing is that I keep forgetting my camera when we are at restaurants or markets or places where we have had amazing food. I am working on this, so hopefully more posts in the coming days. Here is a traditional Greek salad, without lettuce.

It was made for the night of the Eurovision song contest, for which we made food from a lot of countries. Bangers and Mash – UK, Goats cheese – France, Chorizo and Salchichon – Spain Smoked fish- Scandinavia and a shredded beetroot salad to represent the Ukraine, Moldova and other other eastern European countries. I love beetroot.The Greek Salad was dressed with fresh Olive oil from our friend Gabri’s mother. It is truly delicious.

Ingredients

  • fresh ripe tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 small cucumbers, diced
  • 1 small onion, sliced
  • feta cheese
  • black olives, pitted
  • oregano
  • olive oil
  • a little salt

Method

Chop the ingredients and mix together. drizzle with olive oil to finish and season with a little salt.

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We followed Julia Child’s mayonnaise recipe. It’s the most detailed, step by step explanation I’ve ever followed but it’s definitely necessary to make mayonnaise. This makes roughly 1 cup of mayonnaise. To make more see ratio chart here.

Ingredients

  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 cup of oil (We used olive oil, but be careful. We learned that olive oil is basically fruit juice and therefore can go bad and have a rancid after taste. Try to find the freshest olive oil you can).
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons lemon juice or vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon mustard

Method

These are her directions for hand-beaten mayo. There are different directions if you want to use an electric blender.

It’s very important that all your ingredients be room temperature. If your oil is cold, heat it until it’s tepid. It is also recommended that you heat your bowl in warm water and then dry it off before you put the eggs in.

Take your 2 eggs and separate the whites from the yolks. Put the yolks in a bowl and beat with a whisk for 1 to 2 minutes until they are thick and sticky. Add 1 tbsp of lemon juice or vinegar, salt and mustard. Beat for 30 seconds.

Now that the egg yolks are thick they can absorb the oil. Eggs can’t absorb too much oil too quickly, so you must be patient or your mixture will curdle. To prevent curdling, Julia recommends taking a spoonful of oil out of the measuring cup and placing the spoon over the bowl of yolks. Add the oil drop by drop, stirring constantly, until you’ve used up 1/3 to ½ of your oil. At this point you’re safe and you can add the rest of the oil a tablespoon at a time until it’s all incorporated. The sauce should be thick and sort of stiff. You can add another tablespoon of lemon juice as well as more salt and mustard.

Beat in 2 tablespoons of boiling water. This will also help prevent curdling.

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Usually canned products aren’t renowned for their quality, but here in Spain some of the most amazing  quality products come from a can. I remember Anthony Bourdain being blown away by some of the amazing produce found in cans in the north of Spain. These mussels are so tasty, and I like to have them as an appetizer. These came in olive oil and Jerez Sherry wine vinegar, others come with spices and are equally as good… But if you come to Spain, my advice is to get some because they are delicious. I’ll photograph the packaging when I get a chance.

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